How do we keep your personal data?

The activities of the Chancellor of Justice are public. Public documents generated in the course of the work of the Chancellor of Justice can be accessed on its website and via the public register of documents.

 

In performing its day-to-day duties, the Chancellor of Justice receives information that may contain personal data, incl. sensitive and private information. Such data may be also contained in your application addressed to the Chancellor of Justice. The data also reach the Chancellor of Justice when you are one of the parties to the proceedings of the Chancellor of Justice.

Below you will find an overview of the purposes of use of your personal data by the Chancellor of Justice, the manner in which the data is retained in the Office of the Chancellor of Justice, the cases in which we may transfer your personal data to third parties, and your rights upon processing your personal data.

 

The described principles do not apply to the processing of the data of legal persons or other authorities or to the processing of personal data on websites that we have referred to on our website (external links).

 

If you have any questions concerning the processing of personal data, you may contact Erkki Sven Margna, the Data Protection Officer of the Office of the Chancellor of Justice (e-mail: erkkisven.margna@oiguskantsler.ee, telephone: +372 693 8430).

 

 
  • How do we keep your personal data once you have addressed the Chancellor of Justice?

 

The Office of the Chancellor of Justice only accesses private information for the purpose of performing the duties of the Chancellor of Justice and for replying to your enquiry. We may use the correspondence with you internally for assessing and improving the quality of our work.

 

Your enquiries and the related correspondence are registered in the register of documents of the Chancellor of Justice. Data are disclosed in the public view of the register of documents in accordance with the requirements provided for in the Public Information Act. If the sender of a letter is an individual, we only disclose the initials of the person, the grounds for the access restriction and the term of validity thereof in the register of documents. Enquiries and replies by individuals are not available in the public view of the register of documents of the Office of the Chancellor of Justice, unless you yourself have asked to make the correspondence public.

 

Access to correspondence with individuals is restricted. If anyone wishes to access a document sent to the Office of the Chancellor of Justice, which contains private data, they may submit a request for information. We provide an extract of the part of the document that is not subject to access restrictions. Upon issuing a document, we make a person’s contact details (i.e. their postal address, telephone number, e-mail address, etc.) illegible. In other respects, the restriction of access depends on the contents of the requested document. The possible grounds of access restrictions are set out in § 35 of the Public Information Act. The Chancellor of Justice has the right to designate correspondence concerning individuals for internal use only based on subsection 8 of § 23 of the Chancellor of Justice Act.

 

If you send a letter to the Office of the Chancellor of Justice as a representative of a legal person or authority and add your personal contact details, your contact details will be visible in the public view of our register of documents, because it is not presumed that you sent the letter as an individual.

 

Access to documents may also be restricted within the Office of the Chancellor of Justice, depending on the contents of the document. In such an event, access is granted to the official(s) who need(s) to access the document upon performing their duties.

 

Regardless of the established access restrictions, the Office of the Chancellor of Justice issues a document to an authority or person who has a statutory right to access it and a reasoned need for it for the purpose of performing their duties (e.g. a body conducting pre-court proceedings, the court). The authority or person must not transfer the restricted access information to third parties without the consent of the Office of the Chancellor of Justice.

 

If the Office of the Chancellor of Justice needs to make enquiries in order to reply to you, the Office discloses your personal data only to the minimum, i.e. indispensable extent. If you have sent to the Chancellor of Justice an enquiry that another authority is competent to answer, we will forward it to the respective authority and inform you thereof by an official letter. If your application contains sensitive personal data, we will forward it only with your consent.

 

Upon delivering replies, we use the address data that you have provided us with or the address data obtained from the population register. We send e-mail replies in the unencrypted form.

 

The Chancellor of Justice has the right to make the contents of a processed application and the end result of the proceedings public via the mass media or otherwise, without disclosing the data that allow for identifying individuals. On the website we have published the opinions of the Chancellor of Justice, from which the data of the addressee and other information that could identify the person have been removed where necessary. We do not disclose opinions with sensitive contents on our website.

 

  • How do we keep your personal data when you visit the website of the Chancellor of Justice?

 

If you visit the website of the Chancellor of Justice and access the information available there, information on the visit is collected for statistical purposes.

 

We use the Google Analytics tool on our website, which collects general data on how the visitor uses the web pages of the Chancellor of Justice. For instance, Google Analytics collects information on the visitor’s location, web browser, operating system version, time and duration of the visit, the number of webpage visits and movement between the web pages. The Office of the Chancellor of Justice sees the collected data only in the non-personalised form. The Office uses the information to make its website more user-friendly.

 

  • How do we retain and use your personal data when you apply for a job or internship in the Office of the Chancellor of Justice?

 

We evaluate job and internship applications on the basis of the information disclosed by the candidate. If necessary, we search for additional information from public sources (e.g. information available on the Internet). If you have specified references in your CV, we presume that we are allowed to contact these people. Only the person involved in the recruitment process has access to the collected information.

 

You also have the right to learn which data we have collected about you in connection with applying for a job. You also have the right to access the data, give explanations and the right to object. The Office of the Chancellor of Justice does not disclose the data of other candidates.

 

Documents obtained during recruitment are retained for the purpose of settling possible legal disputes arising in the recruitment process until the expiry of the claim (1 year). We retain your data for a longer period only with your written consent.

 

The data of candidates is subject to access restrictions and third parties (incl. competent authorities) get access thereto only in events provided by law.

 

  • How can you access the data that the Office of the Chancellor of Justice has collected on you?

 

In order to access the data that the Office of the Chancellor of Justice has collected on you, submit to us a request signed by hand or a digitally signed request so that we can identify you. Data collected on you are only disclosed to you personally. We disclose your data to a third party only if such third party has a statutory right to it.

 

Where possible, we disclose your data to you in the requested manner within five working days as of the receipt of the request, but no later that within one month. The Office of the Chancellor of Justice may dismiss clearly unfounded or repeated requests or ask for a reasonable fee, given the administrative expenses incurred for granting the request.

 

The Office of the Chancellor of Justice refuses to grant your request if it may:

  1. harm the rights and liberties of another person;
  2. obstruct the prevention of a crime or the catching of a criminal;
  3. make establishing the truth more difficult in criminal proceedings;
  4. jeopardise the protection of the secret of the filiation of a child.

 

If you find that your rights have been infringed upon processing data, you can address the Data Protection Inspectorate or the court.